Secure the News: A Dialogue on How News Organizations, Tech Companies and Technologists Can Protect the Future of Journalism

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Session Description

Building on CPJ's 2015 Tech Summit (https://cpj.org/blog/2015/06/securing-the-newsroom-cpj-journalists-and-technolo.php), this session will convene journalists, technologists, technology company representatives and others to discuss how news organizations can protect the free flow of news by deploying strong encryption by default, adopting security standards for staff, and better educating readers about the threat environment. Draft outcomes include: 1. Enhanced understanding of, and support for, HTTPS and STARTTLS deployment in newsrooms large and small. CPJ will be deploying a major "Secure the News" campaign to do just that in 2016. We will be reaching out to Freedom of the Press Foundation, EFF, Let's Encrypt and other organizations. 2. Dialogue around actionable minimum best practices for news *organizations* other than robust HTTPS and STARTTLS deployments. 3. Dialogue and an action plan around regularizing emergency response procedures at technology companies for situations in which a journalist/blogger is kidnapped, arrested or otherwise under duress.

Secure the News: A Dialogue on How News Organizations, Tech Companies and Technologists Can Protect the Future of Journalism
Presenter/s Geoffrey King, Tom Lowenthal, Oktavía Jónsdóttir, Kim Pham
Organization
Bio/s King joined CPJ in 2013 to coordinate the organization's Internet and technology policy efforts. Based in San Francisco, he protects the rights of journalists through advocacy, public education, and engagement with policymakers worldwide. Prior to joining CPJ, King, an attorney by training, represented U.S.-based individuals in constitutional matters involving the freedoms of speech, press, and petition. He is also a documentary photographer whose work has focused on human rights and social movements. In addition to his work as an advocate and journalist, King teaches courses at UC Berkeley on digital privacy law and policy, as well as the intersection of media and social change. King holds a bachelor's degree in Mass Communications, Phi Beta Kappa and with Highest Distinction, from UC Berkeley. He earned his law degree from Stanford Law School. His public GPG encryption key fingerprint is 4749 357C E686 71B1 4C60 F149 9338 5A57 27FA 494C.
Language English, possibly Spanish
Topics

Session Comments